Seating Your Wedding Guests for Dummies

Someday, you will thank yourself for getting this one right

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There is no way around it, certainly not all of your wedding guests are comfortable around each other, not all of the families get along, and that’s the number one reason why conflicts arise before weddings unless you actually make some effort and plan your seating chart ahead of time. Yes, it’s hard work and it can consume some good hours of your day, but it’s definitely going to be appreciated by all of your guests when they find that their needs have been met. And for that, you will thank yourself someday, maybe even sooner than you thought.

One week before the wedding is the perfect time to start assigning the wedding tables and seats. Here is your optimum guide to doing just that.

Wedding planner: Le Reve

 

Break it down:

Now that you have a clear idea of the average number of the attendees and their names, all you have to do is break down your full guestlist into smaller lists after you receive all the invitation responses aka the RSVPs. Each shortlist should be assigned its own table or at least should have a dedicated area. The lists can go by relativity or by families or you can just create lists out of the blue, based on your knowledge of the people. 

Wedding planning: Aya Fahmi

 

First things first:

Get going with the main and the most important tables first, like those of the parents, the parents in law and the grandparents. Keep your best friends, bridesmaids, and groomsmen seated close enough to you, so you can see them and communicate with them easily during the wedding. 

Wedding Planner: Noha Khalil 

Consider this:

There are some points that you need to take into consideration while picking the seats for your guests, but remember, there are no rules! You only go with what suits you best. 

1. The relationship history between the guests at your wedding.

2. The individual differences between the people and the cultural backgrounds of each group.

3. Whether these people know each other or not and if they are open to new experiences and conversations.

4. The ages, the age gaps, and the different generations.

5. The groups and the people who haven’t seen each other for too long and would like to catch up on things at your wedding. It’s a good thing to give them the space to do that by placing them next to each other.

6. The distance between your table, the dance floor, and the rest of the tables. Keep the younger gens closer to the dancefloor and the older ones further from it so it’s not too loud for them.  

7. Making the tables’ numbers and name cards obvious to guests, so they can see them once they arrive. 

8. Creating a physical table chart with all the tables and numbers and placing it at the entrance of your venue, so your guests can see where they should go and can find each other easily during the night. 

9. Making a kids table or area where all the kids can find each other, mingle, play, and dance together for the evening without bothering any of the guests. 

10. Check out our creative seating chart ideas here. (Add a link to the pictures on our website for the seating chart ideas)

Wedding planner: Dejavu weddings

Skip this: 

Feel free to skip any traditions when it comes to seating, the important thing is that everyone enjoys their day, including both of you. So, we can shed a spotlight on things you may skip if you feel like it:

1. Singles’ table: lately, some weddings are starting to add a table just for the single folks, however, some people really do get offended by that gesture. So, if this doesn’t work for you, forget about the idea.

2. Taking sides: it’s not a must to have a groom’s side and a bride’s side. Skip this if you feel that it’s better for the greater good not to ask people to take sides.

3- Seats: Stand-up weddings are new to the scene, so feel free to have some stand-up tables for your friends and the people who you know won’t use chairs much. 

 

 

There is no way around it, certainly not all of your wedding guests are comfortable around each other, not all of the families get along, and that’s the number one reason why conflicts arise before weddings unless you actually make some effort and plan your seating chart ahead of time. Yes, it’s hard work and it can consume some good hours of your day, but it’s definitely going to be appreciated by all of your guests when they find that their needs have been met. And for that, you will thank yourself someday, maybe even sooner than you thought.

One week before the wedding is the perfect time to start assigning the wedding tables and seats. Here is your optimum guide to doing just that.